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    ‘Urban Interventions (1)’ were originally installed as street signs outside train stations in London. They gave commuters a generous integrative value to take with them as they rushed toward their work environments. This acted as a counterpoint to the contractual values inherent in peoples everyday jobs. The dual use of symbols and words in the street signs reinforces connotations of generosity; whilst the minimalist aspect of the signs creates a space in which an individual can have their own inter-subjective response. The street signs are camouflaged using familiar urban materiality and design motifs, in order to trick the passer by into reading them. To achieve this disguise, the Highways Agency ‘transport font’ was used in conjunction with their secondary range of Pantone colours. (Street sign installation video:  http://youtu.be/E00BslE5L20  )     
  
 
  
    
  
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  ‘Urban Interventions 2’ were installed as street signs in a London park. The signs were designed to convey wider notions of the way people can mentally choose to translate their experiences in the world. With the local park being a place where individuals retreat for some peace and quiet, the contemplative nature of the message within the signs was ideally suited to this environment. The colour purple’s transcendental value was used to reinforce the metaphysical ideas contained within the signs. These ideas were based on a reflective & reductive approach to my own lived experiences. This approach sits in the margins of contemporary aesthetic experience defined by philosopher Richard Shusterman; where the process of reflecting on prior experiences becomes an aesthetic experience in its own right. (Sign installation video  http://youtu.be/Y7rYnQfNzaU  )
       
     
  Urban Interventions (3)  is a collaborative installation with Black Cube Collective & Gayfield Creative Spaces based in Edinburgh. Street Signs have been installed  in the local residential area of New Town / Broughton as well as in the commercially orientated City Centre of Edinburgh. The positive messages of the signs bring integrative values to these areas. This project attempts to challenge the way people think, act and feel within the environments they inhabit.   The physical installation process is supported by Google Reverse Image Search technology. This will allow people with a smart phone to photograph the sign and instruct Google to search its image database for more information and hyperlinks about the project. Apps used to enable this for iOS are Amad Arwat's Reverse Image Search; and for Android Image Search v2.9  Building on recently published work by the Pew Research Centre showing a younger and impoverished demographic of people wholly dependent on their smartphone for essential social functioning; this project attempts to tap into that groups use of technology to bring them into a closer interaction with public art, and the reasons why people make art.  [Urban Interventions 3 is also running concurrently at: CONVERGE 2016, Visual Arts Scotland, Scottish National Gallery Academy Building. 29th January - 20th February 2016]   http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/01/chapter-one-a-portrait-of-smartphone-ownership/    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/04/01/for-more-poor-americans-smartphones-are-lifelines.html    
       
     
AFFIRMATIVE 1
       
     
Affirmative 1 (Lubomirov / Angus-Hughes Gallery)
       
     
AFFIRMATIVE 1
       
     
Getting Into The Rhythm In My Stride